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And there’s a dazzling haze, a mysterious way about you, dear…

couple posing for wedding - Kari & Camron's first dance

A peaceful moment.

 

This couple really gets around (in a good way, of course). She’s from Kansas and he’s from Nevada, they met in Baltimore, and got married in California. Whew! It’s a wonder they ever found each other, so I guess it was meant to be. And lucky for us they live in Memphis, and we got the privilege of working on Kari & Camron’s first dance. 

wedding party posing on beach - Kari & Camron's first dance

I love the attitude in this shot!

 

It’s my contention that the human brain doesn’t process opposites well. Notice how they struggled at first with swiveling in different directions. It’s like that for almost everyone. But then something just clicks, and it all falls into place.

 

Kari & Camron Prepare For Their First Dance

 

We inserted a move that we usually just call the wiggle, wiggle, wiggle, and Kari cracked up and said, “I can’t do that in front of my dad!” She did it, but it’s pretty quick, so see if you can spot it.

 

Kari & Camron’s First Dance

Thanks to the dream team for Kari & Camron’s First Dance!

Venue:  The Resort at Squaw Creek  (Olympic Valley, CA)

Photographer:  Mandy Ford Photography

Videographer:  Lake Full of Pictures 

Wedding Planner:  Jenn Lazon 

 

 

Three easy ways to find out how we can help you with your first dance.

Visit our Lessons page. 

Contact us at (901) 359 – 6467 or cat@catsballroom.com

Try a free lesson to see if you like it. We know your will 😉

 

Schedule Your Consultation

 

It’s the biggest decision I’m about to get right…

Bride and groom in field with mountains in distance.

Could you find a more beautiful location?

 

We loved working on Sarah & Jason’s first dance. There is nothing flashy about this couple, but boy is there a lot of substance. Among other things they’re both whip smart, adventurous, and philanthropic. Their rustic wedding at a ranch in Colorado suited them perfectly, and their first dance to I Choose You showed off their athleticism and charm. My only teeny tiny regret? That no one would see Sarah’s crazy beautiful legs under the wedding gown!

 

Lift during Sarah & Jason’s first dance

Sarah & Jason’s first dance had to have a lift!

Couple laughing

 

Oblique line in Sarah & Jason’s first dance

 

Practicing a dip in Sarah & Jason’s first dance

 

Small details can make a huge difference in how a dance looks and feels. Notice how often a seemingly small adjustment changed everything. And since they both took direction wonderfully, their improvement was usually rapid.

 

Hands on feedback!

 

Sarah and Jason also ticked all the boxes for a great first dance – start early, practice often, cooperate – and it shows in how polished they look.

[Apologies for the poor quality video, but you can still see how great they did.]

Thanks to the dream team!

Photographer: Taylor Jones Photography

Wedding Planner:  Cynthia Zipperly

Band: Raising Cain

[Note: Although they did play for the first dance, due to technical issues the audio in the video isn’t them.]

Three easy ways to find out how we can help you with your first dance.

Visit our Lessons page. 

Contact us at (901) 359 – 6467 or cat@catsballroom.com

Try a free lesson to see if you like it. We know your will 😉

 

Schedule Your Consultation

 

Might just be my everything.

Somehow this pair manages to be both elegant and laid back, which made them super fun to work with. Of course, their first dance turned out beautifully, but what I really love is that you can see how much fun they’re having while they do it.

Enjoying learning together.

 

So Smooth!

Dancing in the moonlight…

Our first free couple’s class in the Downtown Memphis Commission Sunken Mall was a hit! (The decorating plans not so much. Outdoors. Candles. Breezes. Should have seen that coming.) Four intrepid couples came out for some dancing and romancing. We started smooth and sweet with slow lounge, and then kicked it up a notch with some push-pull swing. There were lots of smiles, a few missteps, some pretty good dancing, and no broken toes. I call that a win!

Socially distanced fun for all!

What to do (or not do) on the dance floor.

Just exercising common courtesy will go a long way on the dance floor, but there are a few ballroom specific things you might want to know.

 

 

Navigating the Floor

First of all, where should you be on the floor? For spot dances (swing, rumba, etc.) it really doesn’t matter. Any open space is fine (*usually). But for travelling dances (waltz, foxtrot, etc.) there is a structure similar to a racetrack. If you aren’t moving at all, stay in the center. Move out a little when you are ready to progress and utilize the periphery when you have the skill to move quickly and navigate effectively. And always keep in mind that the flow is counterclockwise, so you don’t end up going the wrong way on a one-way street. [*Some songs are appropriate for multiple dances, so even if you are doing a spot dance, be aware if others are travelling. In other words, don’t do swing in the foxtrot lane.]

Asking For/Accepting a Dance

It is a convention when at a ballroom event to dance with a variety of partners. This is partly to ensure that everyone has a good time, and partly to improve your own dancing. You can dance with more accomplished partners to elevate your own skills, then pay it back by dancing with the less experienced. If you are part of a group, try to dance with everyone at least once. If you’re on your own, spend some of your dances on the wallflowers. Not only is it kind, but you may find yourself pleasantly surprised by the experience. You don’t need to avoid approaching someone who is clearly part of a couple, but it is generally a good idea to ask their partner if they mind. Most don’t, but it’s better to ask. And if you are the one being asked, say yes unless there is a compelling reason not to. You don’t have to subject yourself to a partner that is known to be handsy or has extreme body odor, but don’t reject someone because they are inexperienced, socially awkward, or not part of your immediate circle. Again, you might be surprised.

Once you have asked someone to dance you should escort them onto the floor and back off again afterward. Simply walking away and leaving someone standing alone on the floor is rude and probably won’t get you many second dances. When the music ends, thank your partner, offer your arm, and return them to their seat. You may be a little less formal with someone you know well and dance with often, but it’s always appropriate to show appreciation for your partner.

Partnership

Always strive to complement your partner. For the leader that means not being rough or trying to force patterns far beyond your partners current capabilities. Making someone look good and feel comfortable is far more effective than showing off every move you know on someone who isn’t ready for them. Being able to assess a partner’s competency is a valuable skill, and dancing at (or slightly above) their level will make them feel accomplished and you look like a good leader.

As for followers, they should follow. It may be tempting to try and anticipate your partner’s next move. It’s also hard to resist “helping” a leader who seems to be struggling. Neither makes you or your partner a better dancer. Also, avoid breaking out things like dramatic styling or advanced syncopations on inexperienced partners. It will confuse and short-circuit them. Instead, concentrate on perfecting the basics and save the frills for someone who can match and appreciate them.

And no matter what, avoid blaming and complaining. Even if you’re right, it won’t make you very popular. It’s far too common (and a particular pet peeve of mine) to hear weak dancers complaining about the perceived inadequacies of their partners. You will always be sought-after and admired if you concentrate on improving your own skill and are generally kind and encouraging to others.

Showing Off

Save the tricks for performances. Full body drops, lifts, and the like have no place in social dancing. That kind of behavior is potentially dangerous, intimidates beginners, and irritates experienced dancers. If you’re truly a good dancer, you don’t need to prove it by slinging someone over your head on a crowded floor.

Collisions

Even the best dancers following all the rules will occasionally bump into one another. So will you. Often it is unclear who bumped into whom. Never try to assign blame. Simply say “excuse me” (or gracefully acknowledge the apology if you where clearly the bumpee) and move on. If you do encounter the rare aggressive (or oblivious) dancer that frequently plows into others, it is best to simply avoid them.

Common (Or Not) Sense

And finally, a few general guidelines that apply whether in a lesson or at a gala. They may seem like common sense, but experience tells me they still bear mentioning.

  • Don’t eat garlic or onions beforehand (unless everyone does), and don’t convince yourself that you can cover it up with a swig of mouthwash.
  • Take a shower and wear clean clothes.
  • Carry gum or mints.
  • Don’t douse yourself in cologne/perfume.
  • Put away the cell phone (unless you’re a surgeon or volunteer fireman on call) and pay attention to the people you’re with.

 

Now you know, so go out and have fun!

 

We can reach for the stars we find along the way …

 

 

 

 

 

I’ll admit I’m a sucker for a Disney princess. You know the kind of woman who has her own tiara and isn’t afraid to rock it in public? And since both bride and groom are carriage drivers, the wedding also included a dog and a horse! Who could ask for more?

 

 

 

 

It takes a lot of hard work (and a little glitter) to go from awkward …

 

… to amazing!

 

What, Why, Who, Where, & When

Practice Makes Progress

What

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines practice as to do or perform often, customarily, or habitually or to perform or work at repeatedly so as to become proficient. The upshot is repetition and habit. Trying to remember some steps 5 minutes before your lesson is not practice – it’s review.

 

Have Fun Practicing With Friends

 

Why

Notice that part of the second definition above is to become proficient. That is one of the main reasons for practice. Presumably you’re taking dance lessons with the goal of becoming a good dancer, and practice is the key to success. You’ll also enjoy your lessons more because you’ll progress faster and feel a greater sense of achievement. And if your goal is specific and short term (e.g. a first dance at a wedding), you’ll save money because you’ll need fewer lessons to reach your objective.

Another important (and often underappreciated) reason for practicing is simply that it’s fun. If it’s not, then you’re taking it too seriously or you need to find another hobby.

 

be Joyful

 

Who

Alone. I often hear people say they can’t practice because they don’t have a partner. I’m going to call bull on that. Sure, dancing with someone else is part of the fun and is necessary to improve your ability to lead or follow. But rhythm, timing, technique, quality of movement, body lines, and pattern recall can all be practiced on your own. That’s a lot of stuff! Take responsibility for improving your own dancing and not only will you feel pride in your accomplishments, but you’ll be a far more attractive to potential dance partners when they’re available.

With a Partner. If you do have a partner that is willing and available, then by all means take advantage of it. Now is the time to sharpen your leading or following skills. Just make sure it’s fun, because be it a friend, spouse, sibling, or whatever, a partner that has fun and feels appreciated is far more likely to want to repeat the experience.

In Your Own Head. Don’t underestimate the power of power of visualization Many elite athletes use it regularly and so can you. Fully engage your senses. Hear the music. Picture your lines. Sense your partner. Feel your muscles contract and lengthen. Done correctly visualization can be highly productive. It can also be deeply engrossing, so though you can do it anywhere (at the airport, in the grocery line, at a red light), use some common sense about when to practice in it.

 

Hear It, See It, Feel It

 

Where

At Home. Practicing in your home is the easiest (and lowest pressure) option and probably the one you will use the most. Push back the chairs, pour a glass of wine (or not), put on some music, and have some fun.

At a Studio. Most studios have a weekly practice party, and many also organize outings for their students. There are several advantages to attending these on a regular basis.  You will get the chance to practice with others that are interested in and learning the same things you are, instructors will be on hand to help if you get stuck, and the music will be varied and appropriate.

Gyms, Churches, Country Clubs, and Community Centers. Many organizations have rooms set aside for group exercise and social gatherings that are available to members when not in use. Be sure to find out what the policy is to access them, and if there are any restrictions (such as available times or types of footwear allowed), but don’t be afraid to think outside the box. More than once I’ve heard of people practicing in unused racquetball courts or park pavilions.

At Work. No, I’m not suggesting that you start slacking at work or engaging your coworkers in flash mobs. This one is best explained with a few examples from actual students that have found creative ways to fit practice into their workdays.

  • A couple that work in the same office use the conference room to practice during lunch. Note that people may look at you funny when you both come out rumpled and breathing hard.
  • A man improves his Latin motion while walking up the parking garage ramp. He says the attendants love it.
  • A middle school football coach practices choreography with his fiancée in the gym after school.
  • A blacksmith dances hustle while at the forge. I still can’t quite picture how this works, but he’s a great dancer, so it must.

On the Town. For some this is the most intimidating possibility, but if you go to a nightclub, class reunion, or wedding reception and have the opportunity to dance, then take it. Don’t worry if you don’t know much or no one else is dancing. Chances are they know even less than you do, and they’ll be impressed and curious about what you’re doing.

 

Make The Most Of Your Workday

 

When

As often as possible.

 

They May Have The Hold Backwards, But They’re Having Fun!

 

… I’ll spend loving you.

 

 

“If we’re going to be awkward, at least we’ll be awkward together” is one of the sweetest things I’ve overheard in a lesson. For better or worse, right? And although they did struggle a bit at first, with patience and practice they had a lovely first dance in the end.

 

The Struggle …

 

… and the Reward.

I can only give you love that lasts forever…

 

 

Every first dance should showcase the personalities of the couple. In this case she’s sassy and he’s suave. That was enough to get us rolling. But when we found out that he is a serious hat aficionado, we knew we could really have some fun. Don’t let how easy they made it look fool you. Working with a prop of any kind is tricky and they did an amazing job.

 

As confidence grows.

 

It all comes together!